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Medical Transcriptionists

Transcriptionists must understand medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, diagnostic procedures, and treatment assessment.

Transcriptionists must understand medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, diagnostic procedures, and treatment assessment.

Quick Facts:
2010 Median Pay $32,900 per year
$15.82 per hour
Entry-Level Education Postsecondary non-degree award
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2010 95,100
Job Outlook, 2010-20 6% (Slower than average)
Employment Change, 2010-20 5,600

What Medical Transcriptionists Do

Medical transcriptionists listen to voice recordings that physicians and other health professionals make and convert them into written reports. They interpret medical terminology and abbreviations in preparing patients’ medical histories, discharge summaries, and other documents.

Work Environment

Medical transcriptionists work for hospitals, physicians’ offices, or third-party transcription service providers, or they are self-employed. Many transcriptionists work from home offices, receiving dictation and submitting drafts electronically.

How to Become a Medical Transcriptionist

Medical transcriptionists typically need postsecondary training. Prospective medical transcriptionists must have an understanding both of grammar and of word-processing software.

Pay

The median annual wage of medical transcriptionists was $32,900 in May 2010.

Job Outlook

Employment of medical transcriptionists is expected to grow 6 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations.

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